Posts Tagged ‘Michael W. Quinn’

Ethical Policing and Body-Worn Cameras Among Topics at SUNY Canton’s Annual Law Enforcement Day, March 28

Thursday, March 24th, 2016

SUNY Canton has invited speakers to address “Ethics in Criminal Justice,” including timely conversations about body-worn cameras and interrogation techniques at the sixth annual Law Enforcement Day.

The college’s Criminal Justice department will be holding the daylong series of presentations Monday, March 28, in SUNY Canton’s Kingston Theater.

“Law Enforcement Day allows our students to learn from experts and experienced professionals,” said Susan E. Buckley, SUNY Canton criminal justice department chair. “In the past, we’ve highlighted many areas of criminal investigation, anti-terrorism, and law enforcement management. This year’s theme will focus on the current ethical challenges criminal justice professionals face in many aspects of their daily careers.”

The event begins at 10 a.m., with “Ethical Policing is Contagious” presented by retired Minneapolis Police Department Decorated Sergeant Michael W. Quinn. Quinn was an instructor in use of force, deadly force, firearms, chemical agents, high-risk warrants, SWAT tactics, instructor development and officer survival and is a noted expert on police ethics. He published “Walking With the Devil: The Police Code of Silence” in 2005, and wrote a monthly column on police ethics for Officer.com from 2006 to 2008. Currently, Quinn is working with the International Ethics and Leadership Training Bureau, LLP.

At 1 p.m., SUNY Canton Instructor Justin C. Spaulding will be presenting “Law Enforcement Considerations of Body-Worn Camera Technology.” Spaulding was previously employed as a police officer for the Colorado Springs Police Department, where he was assigned to patrol, investigations, revising standard operating procedures, training development, and teaching at the Colorado Springs Police Academy. “There has been an ongoing debate about the use and deployment of body-worn cameras,” Spaulding said. “The technology itself is part of a larger ethical conversation about policing philosophy and practices.”

Presentations conclude at 2:15 p.m. with “Mechanics and Dynamics of Obtaining and Evaluating Confession and Statement Evidence” with James L. Trainum, a former cold case homicide detective and the head of the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department’s violent crime case review project. He’s a noted advocate of interrogation reform and video taping interrogations. Trainum has made a study of false confessions and strongly encourages systems to avoid wrongful convictions. He has authored several publications and has made numerous presentations on a variety of law enforcement topics.

Law Enforcement Day is held as an extra-learning opportunity for students in the criminal justice programs. Other interested parties, including students, members of the law enforcement community and members of the public, are also encouraged to attend the free presentations.

SUNY Canton offers bachelor’s degree programs in Homeland Security, Criminal Investigation, Law Enforcement Leadership, as well as an associate degree in Criminal Justice. Alongside the David Sullivan St. Lawrence County Law Enforcement Academy, all of the college’s programs provide students with the theory and practical skills necessary to understand challenges and ethics of law enforcement.

 

About SUNY Canton

SUNY Canton is Northern New York’s premier college for career-driven bachelor’s degrees, associate degrees and professional certificate programs. The college delivers quality hands-on programs in engineering technology, health, management and public service and recently received number one rankings in library resources, library services and tutoring services in the SUNY Student Opinion Survey. The college’s faculty members are noted for their professional real-world experience in addition to outstanding academic credentials. SUNY Canton OnLine offers hundreds of flexible and convenient courses as well as ten exclusively online bachelor’s degrees. The college’s 15 athletic teams compete as members of the NCAA Division III.