Posts Tagged ‘Criminal Justice’

Great-Grandmother Earns Degree with Great-Grandchildren

Friday, October 19th, 2012

An 83-year-old student demonstrated that age should never be a hindrance to higher education. Myrtle Butterfield of Canton is taking courses alongside her two great grandchildren, 65 years after graduating from high school.

Myrtle Butterfield

One of the senior-most nontraditional students in SUNY Canton, Myrtle Butterfield, 83, of Canton studies between classes. Butterfield is a liberal arts major scheduled to graduate in December.

“I went to the Office of Admissions with my granddaughter-in-law,” Myrtle recalled. “I met (Admissions Counselor) Brandon Davock and when I walked out, I was enrolled in the Liberal Arts program.”

Her great-grandson, Carter K. Cutway, was a Business Management student during the Spring 2012 Semester, and Myrtle’s great-granddaughter, Jamie L. Butterfield, is in the Criminal Justice program. “Who else can say they went to College with their great-grandmother?” Cutway said.

Myrtle Butterfield

Myrtle Butterfield, 83, with her great-granddaughter Jamie L. Butterfield (right) and Carter K. Cutway (Left). All three attended SUNY Canton at the same time.

“There’s a lot of my family connected with this College,” Myrtle said. “I watched both of my great-grandchildren grow up, and now I get to go to College with them.”

Adjusting to college life did not come easy to Myrtle. “I almost quit during my first week,” she recalled, “but the Accommodative Services Office has been amazing! Everyone is so supportive. What more can you ask for?”

During time at the college and after developing a new routine, Myrtle has developed a new love of learning. She’s been on the President’s list and inducted into two honor societies, and her GPA was in the top 10 percent of her class.

Myrtle often offers advice to her younger classmates. “I went straight from high school to marriage,” Myrtle recalled. “We didn’t have the resources then that we have today. I always regretted not coming to college, but work and family always came first. I tell all of the young, beautiful and wonderful students here not to waste this opportunity.”

Myrtle has also discovered she has a talent for writing prose and poetry. She is scheduled to earn her associate degree in December 2012 and plans to work toward her four-year degree and continue writing.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

Criminal Investigation Student Wins Award From SUNY Police Chiefs

Friday, June 29th, 2012

A volunteer firefighter and EMT who responded to the SUNY Canton Fire in Cook Hall was awarded for his dedicated volunteerism and work ethic.

Criminal Investigation Student Eli Max Receiving an Award

University Police Lieutenant Brian E. Kurish, University Police Chief Lisa E. Colbert, Criminal Investigation major Eli Max, Criminal Investigation Associate Professor Susan Buckley, and Criminal Investigation Instructor Elizabeth A. Erickson presenting Max with the Dr. McBride Criminal Justice Student Achievement Award from the SUNY University Police Chiefs Association.

Eli Max, a criminal investigation major from Freeport who currently resides in Canton, recently received the $500 Dr. McBride Criminal Justice Student Achievement Award presented by the SUNY University Police Chiefs Association.

“Eli represents the attributes we look for and foster in our students,” said Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Carli C. Schiffner, who will become the College’s Interim President on Sept. 1 following President Joseph L. Kennedy’s retirement. “He’s enthusiastic about his education and has all of the qualities of an exceptional leader. These qualities will serve him well in his future law enforcement career.”

Max is a student dispatcher for the SUNY Canton University Police, a volunteer firefighter and EMT with both the Freeport Fire Department and the Canton Volunteer Fire Department. After graduation, he’s hoping to become a detective with the New York City Police Department. Max is also the secretary for the Criminal Justice Student Organization. He was one of the inaugural members of the “Be Proud” program which is designed around the criminal justice certificate program and offers block scheduled courses mirroring a professional work environment.

“Eli was one of the first firefighters on the scene of our Feb. 10 fire in Cook Hall,” noted Elizabeth A. Erickson. “He’s demonstrated a commitment to his course work and excellent time management skills. He has maintained excellent grades on top of working long nights and weekends.”

The Dr. McBride Criminal Justice Student Achievement Award is given annually in recognition of Dr. Bruce McBride, who was instrumental in the evolution of the University Police agency and is heralded as establishing the respected professional requirements for University Police officers.

SUNY Canton Announces New Homeland Security Degree

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

SUNY Canton has added to its number of in-demand, career-oriented majors with the announcement of a new homeland security bachelor of technology degree.

“The Homeland Security Program is the perfect complement to both the criminal investigation and the law enforcement leadership programs,” said SUNY Canton Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Carli C. Schiffner. “Regardless of their major, students will be able to take advantage of course offerings in any of these programs to individualize their approach to their future careers in criminal justice.”

bridge

The State University of New York and the State Department of Education have both granted approval for the new program. Students can apply immediately for enrollment for the Fall 2012 semester.

“We created this program to add another specialized area of education to our options available in the overall criminal justice field,” said Susan Buckley, an associate professor and the criminal investigation department chair. “The homeland security major will prepare students to deter motivated attacks on private and public assets. They will learn how to protect people, property and infrastructures.”

Buckley explained graduates of the program would potentially be eligible to work in a private security firm, private industry, or a federal, state, or local criminal justice agencies including Immigration and Customs Enforcement (the investigative branch of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security), the International Criminal Police Organization, the FBI, and the Transportation Security Administration, among others.

“Where it differs from our current programs is homeland security students will be able to identify a wide range of threats, both foreign and domestic, and be appropriately prepared to respond to those threats,” said Paul R. Bowdre, an assistant professor and a lead faculty member in the new program.

Among key changes in the scope of learning is the integration of technology to monitor and respond to terrorist threats, including fiscal, human resource, and technological concerns.

SUNY Canton is renowned for its course offerings and esteemed faculty in its criminal justice curricula. Criminal investigation was the College’s first four-year degree and began in 1998.

To view the full program webpage, visit http://www.canton.edu/sci_health/home/.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Manager, or call 315/386-7527.

 

Assistant Professor Awarded for Corporate Crime Research

Friday, January 7th, 2011

Brian HarteBusinesses that are engaged with the community and are focused on sustainability may be less likely to be involved in white-collar crime, according to a SUNY Canton assistant professor’s research.

Brian K. Harte, who teaches criminal justice, criminal investigation, and business courses at the College, will be receiving the Overall Best Applied Paper Award from the International Academy of Management and Business (IAMB) for his studies on the impact of federal regulations on corporate-level crime.

He said his topic of study was timely because the general public has shown outrage against unscrupulous companies, and demanded greater transparency of corporate behaviors.

“The lack of strong corporate ethics and fiscally responsible behaviors within corporations over the last decade has created the need for more external governmental controls,” Harte said. “I analyzed the behaviors and environments of Fortune 500 Companies to statistically find correlation between practices and conviction.”

Using statistical analysis, Harte was able to lend support to his hypothesis that businesses with greater access to resources are less likely to engage in corporate criminal activity. Additionally, businesses with a high level of corporate social responsibility are also less likely to be charged with corporate business felonies. “Examples of corporate social responsibility are far-ranging, and can include green initiatives, community involvement, and corporate stewardship,” he said.

He studied notable companies that had been investigated for fraudulent activities, including Enron, Worldcom, and Healthsouth.

“There were substantial differences in the corporate social responsibility reports of companies that had been indicted and those that hadn’t,” Harte said. “It supports the theory that businesses with a commitment to social responsibility are more apt to operate within the law.”

Financial measures and overall company size were not a clear indicator of illegal corporate activity, but instability, and market position may influence decisions to break business laws. Prior to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which was developed in reaction to several high-profile corporate and accounting scandals, it was commonly believed that larger companies were more likely to engage in illegal corporate behavior. Harte found after the regulatory measures were passed, smaller companies were more likely to be convicted of crimes. “One possible explanation is larger firms have more resources, and have the ability to avoid detection of illegal acts more than smaller, financially transparent firms,” he said.

Another area of Harte’s research evaluates the effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, sometimes referred to as Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act. He’s trying to determine what, if any impact the act had – or if it is just business as usual in corporate America.

“The bottom line impacts all corporate decisions and the end goal is to generate revenue,” he said. “More and more I’m finding that businesses that can do that while giving back to their communities or support sustainable growth are the ones that operate within ethical boundaries. If a firm can do both then it is really a win-win scenario.”

Harte will receive his award and present his research Jan. 18 at a ceremony in Orlando, Fla., at an international conference of academic scholars from 20 countries. The IAMB is a professional association dedicated to advancing the research, teaching and practice of management and business worldwide through both academic publications and conferences.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


Law Enforcement Day Tackles School Violence

Wednesday, April 14th, 2010

The SUNY Canton criminal justice program will be commemorating the anniversary of the Columbine tragedy with a Law Enforcement Day symposium on violence in schools.

The day-long event will be honoring local law enforcement professionals and providing educational topics about raising awareness of violence in schools and the community at large. Sessions and presentations will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 20, in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center. The event is free and open to the public.

“It will have been 11 years since the shootings at Columbine High School in Colorado,” said SUNY Canton Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Brian K. Harte. “Our student leaders saw this date as an ideal time to reflect on school violence and create a dialog on how to best safeguard against future incidences.”

Among the topics presented at the symposium will be officer safety issues, self-defense techniques, and law enforcement recruitment. Presenters include local, regional, and SUNY Canton experts.

“These topics are highly relevant for professionals and future professionals working within education, law enforcement, and social services settings,” said Andrew C. Wood, a criminal investigation student and president of the College’s chapter of Beta Psi Delta, a Chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association. “These discussions will review previous national events like Columbine, assess current preparedness and procedures, and take a glimpse into the future. It’s an eye opener to see such a high number of middle and high schools utilizing metal detectors at their front doors.”

For more information, or to register for the event, email harteb@canton.edu or call 315.386.7967.

Criminal Justice and Criminal Investigation Students Win at Conference

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009

SUNY Canton’s future law enforcement professionals received high marks at the American Criminal Justice Association northeast regional conference.

Members of Beta Psi Delta, the SUNY Canton chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association, took home a handful of awards in competitions against students from 17 other colleges.

SUNY Canton Criminal Investigation students Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg, Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale, and Anthony M. Puretti of Canton with their American Criminal Justice Association conference awards.

SUNY Canton Criminal Investigation students Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg, Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale, and Anthony M. Puretti of Canton with their American Criminal Justice Association conference awards.

“This was the first time we competed at an American Criminal Justice Association conference,” noted Criminal Justice Assistant Professor Brian K. Harte, who advises the Beta Psi Delta chapter. “We hope to compete annually as a way to promote our excellent students and our career-driven programs.”

Harte and Criminal Justice Instructor Professor Elizabeth A. Erickson traveled with the students to the conference in Philadelphia, Pa.

Among the Criminal Investigation students who placed at the conference were:

  • Elizabeth S. Ayers of Brooktondale took first place in the upper division criminal law examination.
  • Andrew C. Wood of Ogdensburg took second place in the upper divisions of the criminal law examination and the police administration examination.
  • Anthony M. Puretti of Canton took second place in the upper division of the firearms competition.

The American Criminal Justice Association and its SUNY Canton Chapter emphasizes continuing excellence within the Criminal Justice fields and promotes academic excellence and leadership among students.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 100 courses online each semester. The College’s athletic teams belong to the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years. Construction is now underway for the College’s new Convocation, Athletic, and Recreation Center.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.


International Delegations Arrive at SUNY Canton

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009

Ukrainian Academics to Present, Oct. 29

SUNY Canton officials will be meeting with two delegations from overseas schools over the next week to begin the process of expanding the college’s international programs.

Faculty from the career-driven Dental Hygiene program will be receiving a delegation of Japanese dental hygienists on Thursday, Oct. 22. A second contingent of academics from Dnipropetrovsk State University of Internal Affairs in Ukraine will be on campus on Monday, Oct. 26, to review the College’s Criminal Justice curricula.

(From Left) SUNY Canton Provost William R. Trumble, Dr. Keita Taguchi, Dr. Takuya Okyama, SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy

(From Left) SUNY Canton Provost William R. Trumble, Dr. Keita Taguchi, Dr. Takuya Ohyama, SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy

“Our international programs began with a duel-degree program with Moscow about five years ago,” noted SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy. “That program allowed us to expand our courses, and our classrooms, to students from more places. The articulations add a global approach to our signature programs.”

The delegation of Ukrainian Academics became connected with SUNY Canton through Assistant Professor Tom G. Dempsey, who has taught in Ukraine. Recently, Dempsey and Provost William R. Trumble, along with other College officials visited Dnipropetrovsk State University of Internal Affairs to begin the process of offering the College’s Criminal Justice, Criminal Investigation, and related programs in the former Soviet Union.

“By the end of this visit, we hope to create the plans to offer our courses at their college through on-line, distance learning, or exchange and on-campus programs,” Trumble said. “We hope to design and sign a memorandum of understanding that will allow the two colleges to collaborate further.”

During their visit, the four Ukrainian guests will be holding a symposium on the global recession and its impact on the eastern European criminal justice system from 12 to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29, in Woodcock Conference suite 212. The event is free and open to both the college community and the general public.

Director of International Initiatives Marela Fiacco said that Dental Hygiene is a rapidly growing career in Japan. “During this visit, we’ll be looking to create a three-day workshop at our state-of-the-art Dental Hygiene Clinic in Rome (N.Y),” she said. “Our Japanese visitors are very interested in our techniques and program.”

The Japanese visitors will be meeting with Dental Hygiene Professor Susan Willette. The two-year Dental Hygiene program is offered in conjunction with Mohawk Valley Community College with labs and classroom facilities at the Veteran’s Administration at Griffis Technology Complex. Willette oversees the four-year Dental Hygiene program offered online through SUNY Canton OnLine.

“Geographic boundaries are not a concern for the bachelor’s degree program,” Willette said. “In the future, we could offer the program via virtual classrooms and online course delivery to students anywhere in the world.”

During the summer months, the college hosts on-campus students from Lomonosov Moscow State University in Russia, and students from the American University in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 100 courses online each semester. The College’s athletic teams belong to the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years. Construction is now underway for the College’s new Convocation, Athletic, and Recreation Center.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.

SUNY Canton Law Enforcement Academy Cadets Start Their Careers

Wednesday, May 13th, 2009

David Sullivan - St. Lawrence County Law Enforcement AcademyCheryl Crayford of Heuvelton will be earning a diploma and a badge during her final week at SUNY Canton.

Crayford is one of several Law Enforcement Leadership students who opted to complete their senior-level internships as cadets in the David Sullivan/St. Lawrence County Law Enforcement Academy.

“The 2009 academy graduating class included several students in the Law Enforcement Leadership and Criminal Justice programs,” said Academy Director and University Police Deputy Chief Steven L. Livernois. “By completing their cadet-level training while enrolled in courses, they have placed themselves in a prime position for employment immediately following graduation.”

Crayford is a sworn officer of the Canton Village Police Department and will be completing the field-training portion of her education with the department. She is the daughter of Debra Crayford and is a 2005 graduate of Heuvelton Central School.

Both the current students and traditional cadets will be honored at the Academy’s 14th commencement ceremony at 5 p.m. Thursday in the Richard W. Miller Campus Center’s Kingston Theater. The event is free and open to the public.

Among the cadets to complete the law enforcement academy are:

  • Timothy A. Bacon of Massena is a sworn officer of the SUNY Canton University Police. The son of Ronald and Barbara Bacon of Massena, he is a 2003 graduate of Massena High School and a 2007 graduate of Rochester Institute of Technology with a bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice.
  • Robert Barlow of Norfolk is a sworn officer of the Norfolk Police Department. The son of Richard and Nancy Barlow, he is a 2007 graduate of Norwood Norfolk Central High School and a 2009 graduate of SUNY Canton with an associate degree in Criminal Justice.
  • Michael Benedict Jr. of Akwesasne is a sworn officer of the St. Regis Tribal Police Department. The son of Michael and Leona Benedict of Akwesasne, he is a 1989 graduate of Salmon River Central School and a 1992 graduate of North Country Community College.
  • Ryan L. Bogardus of Gouverneur is a sworn officer of the Norwood Police Department. The son of Peter and Penny Borgardus of Fowler, he is a 1998 graduate of Gouverneur Central High School and a 2008 graduate of SUNY Canton with a bachelor’s degree in Criminal Investigation.
  • Ross Carnie of Turin is a sworn officer of the Antwerp Police Department. The son of Robert and Mary Jane Carnie of Turin, he is a 2007 graduate of South Lewis High School and a 2009 graduate of SUNY Canton with an associate degree in Criminal Justice.
  • David Cotey of Norwood completed his pre-employment police basic training. The son of Charles and Ann Cotey of Norwood, he is a 2005 graduate of Norwood Norfolk Central High School and a dual graduate at SUNY Canton with a certificate in Motorsports and an associate degree in Criminal Justice.
  • Tandy Cyrus of Potsdam is a sworn officer of the Norfolk Police Department. The daughter of Joe and Janet Paul, she is a 1997 graduate of Parishville Hopkinton Central High School and is taking business courses at SUNY Canton.
  • Corbin Gates-Shult of Parishville is a sworn officer of the Norfolk Police Department. The son of Faye and step father Jeff Lamar and Keith and stepmother Sara Simon-Shult, he is a graduate of Parishville Hopkinton Central High School and a 2009 graduate of SUNY Canton with a bachelor’s degree in Law Enforcement Leadership.
  • Kristen Jacobs of Hogansburg is a sworn officer of the St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Police Department. The daughter of Lisa Jacobs of Hogansburg and Charles Jacobs of Owego, she is a 2003 graduate of Tioga Central High School and a 2007 graduate of SUNY Potsdam with a bachelor’s in Criminal Justice and Psychology.
  • David J. LeBeau of Ogdensburg is a sworn officer of the Ogdensburg City Police Department. The son of Mary Ellen Founier of Ogdensburg and David R, LeBeau of Lisbon, he is a 1994 graduate of Ogdensburg Free Academy.
  • Steven Lowell of Oneida is a sworn officer of Canastota Police Department. The son of John and Antoinette Lowell of Oneida, he is a 2005 graduate of Oneida High School and a 2009 graduate of SUNY Canton with a bachelor’s in Law Enforcement Leadership.
  • Mark Michaud of Norwood is a sworn officer of the SUNY Canton University Police. The son of Peter and Cynthia Michaud of Norfolk, he is a 1992 graduate of Norwood Norfolk High School and a 1994 graduate of SUNY Canton with an associate degree in Criminal Justice.
  • Julia A. Serviss of Gouverneur is a sworn officer of the St. Lawrence County Sheriffs Office. The daughter of Martin and Catherine Serviss of Gouverneur, she is a 2003 graduate of Gouverneur Central High School and a 2005 graduate of SUNY Canton with an associate degree in Criminal Justice.
  • Decota Thompson of Hogansburg is a sworn officer of the St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Police Department. The son of Kim Loran and Charles Thompson of Hogansburg, he is a 1997 graduate from Salmon River Central High School and a 2008 graduate of St. Lawrence University with a bachelor’s in Marketing.

Cadets of the David Sullivan St. Lawrence County Law Enforcement Academy complete over 700 hours of training over an 18-week period. During that time they engage in strenuous physical training, life-like scenarios, comprehensive lessons in ethics, and life saving techniques to prepare them for their duties as officers of the law.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 100 courses online each semester. The College offers a four-day academic week allowing students greater flexibility for work, family, or other obligations. The College’s athletic teams belong to the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.

Criminal Investigation Major Receives 2009 Outstanding Baccalaureate Graduate Award

Wednesday, May 6th, 2009
SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy congratulates Heather Biamonte, a Criminal Investigation major from Marcy, on her Outstanding Graduate award.

SUNY Canton President Joseph L. Kennedy congratulates Heather Biamonte, a Criminal Investigation major from Marcy, on her Outstanding Graduate award.

A SUNY Canton student who is working toward a law enforcement career is the recipient of the 2009 Outstanding Graduate award at the bachelor’s degree level.

Heather Biamonte, a Criminal Investigation Major from Marcy, received the recognition at the recent Harriett Beggs Honors Convocation. She was presented with a ceremonial plaque and a medallion to accompany her academic regalia for SUNY Canton’s 101st Commencement Ceremony, to be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 16, outside across from French Hall.

“Heather is a very reliable, mature student both in a professional and academic environment,” said Criminal Justice Instructor Liz Erickson. “I commend her for her hard work and preparations in and out of the classroom.”

Biamonte has been involved in many activities during her four years at the college. She was the editor of the school paper, The Tribune, the secretary for Alpha Phi Sigma High Honor Society, and a member of the Criminal Justice Honor Society.

She received a John L. Halford Sr. Scholarship through the SUNY Canton Foundation for her first two years at SUNY Canton and the Flora Bertram Geller Scholarship in 2008.

“Heather is one of the most organized people I know,” said Sindy Afriat, a fellow Criminal Investigation student. “She has always proven herself as a valuable team member in all of our group projects.”

She volunteered at the College’s Girl Scout Investigation program (nicknamed GSI), which helps teach young women the aspects of Criminal Investigation. She has also participated in several community outreach programs through her honor society.

Currently, the award-winning Criminal Investigation major is completing her senior level internship in her hometown.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 100 courses online each semester. The College offers a four-day academic week allowing students greater flexibility for work, family, or other obligations. The College’s athletic teams belong to the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.

SUNY Canton Prof Introduces iPod Content

Monday, March 2nd, 2009
Kevin Davis, a Criminal Justice student in SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Brian Harte's class holds up his iPod during a lesson.

Kevin Davis, a Criminal Justice student in SUNY Canton Assistant Professor Brian Harte's class holds up his iPod during a lesson.

CANTON – Assistant Professor Brian Harte tells his students turn their iPods on when they come to class.

He’s using the highly-popular multi-media devices to deliver audio and video content in some of his Criminal Justice classes.

“Now I’d like you to write down all of your observations after watching this video,” Harte said as his students popped the earbuds into their ears.

The normal lively conversation in his class has been replaced by the sound of about 20 students scrolling through the menus, and then absolute silence each gazes into their video capable iPod Nano Mp3 players.

“We are right at the front of the trends in higher education by integrating these new technologies,” Harte said after the students had begun their pod-based learning exercise. “I see my students tune out all other distractions when they are watching videos and listening to audio on their iPods.”

During the trial runs, students are asked to review videos at their own speeds and make notes about what they are watching as if they were drafting a police report. The first video showed a police chase down a busy interstate. The method allows the students to watch the videos at their own speed as many times as they’d like while they record their observations.

“I liked the podcast better than watching a video in class because I felt more in control of the content,” Benjamin A. Dent, a student in Harte’s class said.

Dent’s classmates nodded in agreement as a traditional in-class conversation about the video began. The students went on to compare their notes about the chase and the police response portrayed in the podcast.

Harte said he began considering iPods as an emerging educational technology last year and filed a Campus Enhancement grant through the SUNY Canton foundation to purchase 20 iPods. “For some lessons, I think that it is best to speak in a language that students are already accustomed to, or through a method that they consider cool,” he said.

So far, Harte’s lessons consist of interactive video and audio-based lessons like the police chase. He said in the future that he hopes to stream even more interactive content to students on the devices. “You can already download a searchable copy of the New York State Penal Code as an iPhone application,” he noted.

A recent study found that students using iTunes University do better on exams than those who are strictly bound to day-to-day lectures. Podcasted lectures offer students the chance to replay difficult parts of a lecture and therefore take better notes, according to Dani McKinney, a psychologist at SUNY Fredonia, who led the study.

This modernized course delivery is nothing new at SUNY Canton. Approximately four years ago, the college launched SUNY Canton OL to deliver its online courses to broader range of students. Some of the content integrated in the high-tech course offerings is also available for iPod downloads.

Harte is the first at the college to offer the devices as learning tools in his classroom.

SUNY Canton offers a wide variety of career-driven bachelor’s, associate, and certificate programs, as well as three master’s degrees in conjunction with SUNYIT, Utica. Most of SUNY Canton’s new four-year programs are designed so students can take them on-campus, online, or both. SUNY Canton OnLine features more than 100 courses online each semester. The college’s athletic teams belong to the NAIA’s Sunrise Conference, enabling students to compete in their respective sports for four years.

Media inquiries should be directed to Gregory Kie, Media Relations Coordinator, or call 315/386-7528.